How Australia made poisoning animals normal

by Steven Sklifas
https://theconversation.com/how-australia-made-poisoning-animals-normal-107004

Justine M. Philip is a Friend of The Conversation.
Doctor of Philosophy, Ecosystem Management, University of New England

 

One of the many difficulties faced by the pioneers of Australia’s sheep industry was finding a reliable shepherd. Among the convict labour available, for every two experienced farm labourers there were five convicted sheep, horse, cattle or poultry thieves.

 

The conditions were demanding. Convicts returning from pasture with fewer sheep than they left with faced a penalty of up to 100 lashes – close to a death sentence. Going bush was the only option for those unwilling to submit to the punishment back “inside”, as the settlements were called. Sheep were lost through negligence and misadventure, others to hungry dingoes.

 

Eradicating dingoes therefore had a double benefit for the graziers: they would reduce stock losses, and eliminate the need for (unreliable) convict labour.

“Read the full article on The Conversation” Source: How Australia made poisoning animals normal

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